Plastic Warriors · GameName Name Files

GameName stores its names in so-called .nam files, which you can put anywhere on your computer—just navigate to the file using the file list in GameName's window. You can also make your own.nam files, or expand existing ones.

All the available .nam files can be downloaded using the links below.

Making .nam Files

This isn't difficult, all you need is a text editor. (If you're not on a Windows machine, be sure to save the file with DOS/Windows line endings, though.) A .nam file consists of four distinct blocks:

We'll go by each one and present an example as well.

COMMENT

Here you can make remarks that will appear on-screen when the .nam file is selected. This comments section is intended to be used to indicate what kind of names the selected .nam file contains.

Note: if you intend to use commas in the COMMENT section, place a quote (") before and after the comment, otherwise GameName will only recognize the first part of the comment, namely up to the comma.

We want to create a .nam file with Dutch names in it. The COMMENT section reads:

COMMENT
"Dutch.nam contains Dutch names for GameName, both first and last names for men and women."

Note that the quotes are necessary because of the comma after the word "GameName."

MALE

This is followed by a number, which indicates how many male names there are in the .nam file. This in turn is followed by a numbered list of male first names. Put a space between the number and the actual name.

MALE
5
1 Jan
2 Piet
3 Kees
4 Henk
5 Bert

As you can see, after the word MALE is the number 5, which indicates that there are 5 names in the male names list.

FEMALE

Exactly the same as MALE, except now there is a list of female first names, instead of male.

FEMALE
5
1 Ans
2 Els
3 Simone
4 Maria
5 Eva

LAST NAMES

Again, exactly like MALE and FEMALE.

LAST NAMES
5
1 Janse
2 de Vries
3 Pietersen
4 Minderhout
5 Boer

END

Not mentioned above, but at the end of the .nam file you should place the word END. This is to try and make sure GameName knows when it reaches the end of the .nam file, something that went wrong ocassionally when this word was not there.